Super Junior talks to gov’t

See on Scoop.itKorean Wave

Super Junior, Left to Right : Choi Si-won, Eun-hyuk, Sin Dong-hee, Sungmin, Henry and Zhou Mi Members of the K-pop group Super Junior visited the National Assembly in Yeouido, western Seoul, yester

Crystal “CeeFu” Anderson‘s insight:

K-pop artists frequently represent not just sources of entertainment for fans, but also participate in government conversations related to Hallyu, the Korean wave. 

See on www.hancinema.net

The Korean Wave does not really exist

See on Scoop.itKorean Wave

The Korean music scene has changed vastly in the past decade.

Crystal “CeeFu” Anderson‘s insight:

While this article attempts to address the varied uses of the term "Korean wave," it does not address the complex factors that go into the term.  It fails to define the Korean Wave itself, its links to multiple modes of cultural production, such as K-drama and Korean film. The Korean wave is more than a mere marketing tool; it is a phenomenon that has economic, cultural and political implications. Using Psy to make an argument about the Korean wave and its longevity ignores the 20-ish old years of music, television and film that make up the Korean wave, and the fact that K-pop was enjoying global popularity before Psy’s appearance. There needs to be more context provided to make these kinds of assertions about the Korean wave. 

See on beyondhallyu.com

2013 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 20,000 times in 2013. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 7 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

Hyoyeon Opens Instagram Account

See on Scoop.itK-pop Fandoms

Original article from May 15th, 2013:
On May 3rd, Hyoyeon opened an Instagram account and began posting pictures on the popular photo-sharing service.

Crystal “CeeFu” Anderson‘s insight:

Yes, it’s still news when a K-pop artist opens a social network account. The Internet is key to the way a lot of fans engage in fan activity.

See on www.soshified.com

Vote for Girls’ Generation in the ’2013 Mnet Asian Music Awards’

See on Scoop.itK-pop Fandoms

Girls’ Generation has been nominated for four categories for the “2013 Mnet Asian Music Awards”: “Best Female Group”, “Best Dance Performance – Female Group”, “Artist of the Year”, and “BC – UnionPay Song of the Year”.

Crystal “CeeFu” Anderson‘s insight:

It’s award season, and that means mustering up the fan troops to vote. Many fandoms, like SONEs, are encouraging members to vote for Girls’ Generation and support their nomination.

See on www.soshified.com

Epik High Celebrates 10-Year Anniversary with a Video Message

See on Scoop.itKorean Wave

Once a musician, always a musician. October 23 marked Epik High’s 10 year anniversary.  On October 22, Epik High’s official Youtube channel posted a short video with the message “Thank you for the memories” to celebrate the 10-year anniversary of…

Crystal “CeeFu” Anderson‘s insight:

The fan dynamic from Epik High can be described as low-key in relation to idol groups and artists. Yet the fan message is a tried and true strategy. Epik High’s message is less a direct message to the fans and more of a peek into their creative world. 

See on www.soompi.com

Gummy Leaves YG and Signs Exclusive Contract with JYJ’s C-JeS Entertainment

See on Scoop.itKorean Wave

It’s official! Gummy will be joining JYJ at C-JeS Entertainment.
K-Pop officials confirmed on October 24 Gummy has signed an exclusive contract with C-JeS Entertainment.

Crystal “CeeFu” Anderson‘s insight:

This particular move is interesting. YG has  reuptation for giving its artist more creative freedom, yet Gummy did not renew her contract. Instead, Gummy becomes the second musical act represented by C-JeS. One can only speculate as to what motivated her decision, but this challenges the notion that artists never have the freedom to make such decisions. 

See on www.soompi.com

Why is the human body such a horrible thing nowadays? You show a bit of skin and you’re considered a slut? And to blame everything on American music, really? Kpop fans annoy me sometimes.

See on Scoop.itKorean Wave

Who knows? It’s especially worse in Korea, as we’ve seen with banned costumes, music videos, dances, ect. Especially with Hyuna.

Crystal “CeeFu” Anderson‘s insight:

There are people who like K-pop precisely because it is devoid of the focus on the body that some see in music in the United States. While the United States may not be directly to blame, it does have a large influence in global culture. 

See on black-kpop-fans.tumblr.com

[ADMIN POST] DBSKnights 5th Anniversary Giveaway!

See on Scoop.itK-pop Fandoms

DBSKnights’ 5TH ANNIVERSARY
It’s that time of the year again! Five years ago, on September 29, 2008, our founder Portia created DBSK Sleepless Nights as a haven for new and old DBSK fans.

Crystal “CeeFu” Anderson‘s insight:

While some people argue that K-pop fandom is short-lived, several fandoms have long histories. Here, DBSKnights, fans of TVXQ celebrates the fanclub’s  five-year anniversary. 

See on www.dbsknights.net

[TRANS] 131005 TVXQ Message for Cassiopeia Special Day

See on Scoop.itK-pop Fandoms

To. Cassiopeia~^^*
wow~ The meeting with the fans after a long time!…

Crystal “CeeFu” Anderson‘s insight:

Fans help other fans by translating messages. Here, Cassies have translated handwritten messages from Yunho and Changmin from TVXQ.

See on www.dbsknights.net

Album Review: Drunken Tiger’s “The Cure”

See on Scoop.itKorean Wave

After a four-year hiatus and hot on the heels of Tiger JK’s departure from Jungle Entertainment, Drunken Tiger returns with The Cure, the “group”’s ninth release.

Crystal “CeeFu” Anderson‘s insight:

While we can all disagree on the technical or aesthetic aspects of music and have different opinions on what is good or bad, this article reflects the tendency to reduce hip hop to just one mode. Even as it identifies Tiger JK’s personal travails as inspiration for the release, it blasts the The Cure because of its lack of "acid flows, endless cool, and sick production."  Erika explains that "the emotional sentiments are as hackneyed as the beats, not because Tiger JK comes from a place of insincerity, but because the audience has been there, done that, and come home with the t-shirt." Overall, Erika says that this album is not up to Tiger JK’s previous work because its too mello and not "bombastic" enough. 

Such opinions represent a refusal to allow hip-hop to grow and change. It keeps hip-hop on one setting, and discourages innovation, or even anything that deviates from a norm that defines hip-hop as hard. We’ve seen this before, when the norm became gangster rap, and other modes fell to the wayside, and many regret that turn. As Mark Anthony Neal once said, hip-hop has a mortgage. If it is truly a mode for personal expression, then it follows that personal circumstances change, and it may not be as important to talk about what’s going on in the club anymore. In addition, the relentless quest for "something new" from artists is just unrealistic to maintain, and at some point, artists of a certain level cease to have to prove themselves. 

 

If we are going to talk about Tiger JK’s dialogue with various musical traditions, I would expect the musical knowledge of writers to be wide and varied enough to bring a critical eye to the musical traditions at play, musical references that go beyond the 1980s. 

 

 

See on seoulbeats.com

Vocal Group What Women Want Debut with Music Video for “Curious”

See on Scoop.itKorean Wave

Rookie vocal group What Women Want has made their debut with their first single, “Curious.” The music video was shared with English subtitles through the official Loen Entertainment YouTube channel.

Crystal “CeeFu” Anderson‘s insight:

One thing missing from the K-pop scene right now is a female vocal group. What Women Want diversifies the landscape by centralizing their voices.

See on www.soompi.com

Roundtable: Is Korean Hip-Hop Getting a Bad Rap?

See on Scoop.itKorean Wave

K-hip-hop came to forefront of the news when Swings pushed the first domino by releasing “King Swings,” a track intending to have a similar effect as that of Kendrick Lamar‘s feature in Big Sean‘s “Control” in the US.

Crystal “CeeFu” Anderson‘s insight:

Underneath the conversation about the diss tracks is some discourse about how, as one participant puts it, "With K-pop, we are able to enjoy everything even without knowing what they are singing about due to the visual aspect of their performances. But that is not present in K-hip-hop where their artistry relies on understanding of their songs in their full context with their slang, metaphors, puns and every other wordplay that is out there."  While lyrics are significant, they are not the only component of hip hop music. Some would argue that the beat is equally important, and that musical aspect is something that transcends spoken language.  Others would point to a general spirit of individualism in hip hop that speaks to people around the world. People who don’t listen to KHip-Hop because of the language probably aren’t listening to much music in any language beyond their own.   Lots of insight about the global spread of hip-hop can be found in Global Noise: Rap and Hip-Hop Outside the USA, edited by Tony Mitchell.

See on seoulbeats.com

I think this blog could be better if you admins at least had a Kpop experience or something :/ or interviewed them or something like other sites have had experiences with the idols or have been to …

See on Scoop.itKorean Wave

While I understand where you’re coming from, we can’t help that we’ve never ‘had a kpop experience’ and I can’t say any of us will apologize for it?

Crystal “CeeFu” Anderson‘s insight:

Most global fans experience K-pop via the Internet. At the same time, a lot of K-pop occurs on the Internet: Instagram accounts, tweets, blogs, YouTube. Social media is the primary way that K-pop spread across the globe. Most global K-pop fans will not have a "Kpop experience" but this does not diminish their participation in K-pop, nor should it render their observations and opinions about K-pop as invalid. 

See on black-kpop-fans.tumblr.com

‘Crayon Pop’ profiled on U.S. program (2013/08/30)

See on Scoop.itKorean Wave

The U.S. morning show “Good Morning America”, broadcast a report about the Korean girl group Crayon Pop on Wednesday, under the title “Will Crayon Pop Create a ‘Gangnam Style’ Sensation?

Crystal “CeeFu” Anderson‘s insight:

Appearances by K-pop groups like Crayon Pop on American television provide opportunities for exposure to mainstream audiences. At the same time, Crayon Pop is only one kind of K-pop, and as the story links the group’s work to the wacky antics of Psy, I wonder if this is the only kind of K-pop that mainstream audiences will accept (or the only kind of K-pop that they will be exposed to). Again, these are images of Asian women that do not challenge the way Americans think of Asian women. 

See on www.hancinema.net