ICYMI: iFans Update – Girls’ Generation (SNSD) Into the New World Remix Cover Dances

Girls' Generation (SNSD)
Girls’ Generation (SNSD)

The iFans project rolls on with more cover dance!  The second section of the exhibit, Dance Like Everybody’s Watching: K-pop Cover Dances, features Girls’ Generation‘s “Into the New World Remix.”  Click HERE to view K-pop fans from around the world performing one of the most complicated dance routines by a girl group.

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ICYMI: Ethnicity, Glamour and Image in Korean Popular Music

Lee Hyori, Promo Image, Monochrome
Lee Hyori, Promo Image, Monochrome

The 1960s girl group concept makes regular appearances in K-pop. While some think that this kind of image represents a lack of ethnic identity in a quest for mainstream acceptance, I suggest that the 1960s girl group image promoted by women of color represents an ethnic glamour aesthetic.

Read the rest at KPK: Kpop Kollective….

ICYMI: Pure Love f(x): Feminisms and K-pop Girl Groups

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Originally published on KPK: Kpop Kollective by CeeFu

K-pop girl groups tend to be described as sexy, fierce or cute.  Some suggest that images of fierceness encourage girls to be empowered, while images of cuteness take away their agency.  However, responses by fans of f(x), a K-pop female group, suggest that fans prefer unique and diverse images of women.

Click here to read the rest!

ICYMI: iFans Case Studies Status Update

Infographic based on data collected by Crystal S. Anderson as part of the iFans research study

Originally published on KPK: Kpop Kollective by CeeFu

If you keep with research on K-pop, you may be aware of the iFans: Mapping Kpop’s International Fandom project.  The surveys that make up the qualitative studies seek to understand how the fandoms differ from one another and their relationship to the groups they support. K-pop fans know that the fandoms are unique. Because they have detailed knowledge of the groups they support, they provide a unique perspective on the appeal of their respective groups. Too often, commentators make assumptions about K-pop fans, while the iFans studies goes to the source: the fans.

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ICYMI: Bring The Boys Out!: Fan Attitudes on Male Kpop Groups Differ

Big Band and Super Junior

Originally published on KPK: Kpop Kollective by CeeFu

Some people think that male K-pop groups are all the same. However, research suggests that fans differ in their attitudes towards individual male K-pop groups. Responses collected from fans of Super Junior and BigBang reveal that they also hold different opinions on their music and group dynamic.  Such responses suggest that while some do not distinguish between male K-pop groups, fans do.

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The Unsung And The Unsaid In Kpop

Kpop is subject to a lot of criticism.  A LOT. The most repeated charge against Kpop is that it is manufactured.  But is that really true?  Usually when critics level this charge, they make sweeping generalizations about the whole landscape of pop.  In doing so, they perpetuate stereotypes about the lack of originality in Asian popular culture.

Read more at KPK: Kpop Kollective (originally published January 1, 2012)

Polishing My Tiara, or What It’s Like Being An Orange Princess Today

Yeah, I know all the cool kids are into SNSD and Super Junior and BigBang and SHINee. I like them too. You get to see them doing stuff nearly every day.   But it takes commitment to be a Changjo, a fan of Shinhwa, an Orange Princess.

Cassies always keep the faith and all, but try being an Orange Princess. It is no secret that I LOVE Shinhwa. How do I love thee? Let me count the ways: Andy, Eric, Dongwan, Minwoo, Hyesung, Jun Jin:

While I love the individual members of Shinhwa, you know there is always your bias.  You hear that, Andy? It’s you and me, baby, YOU and ME! It’s true, I have a thing for the maknaes….

Read more at KPK: Kpop Kollective (Originially published on June 22, 2011)

The REAL SM Entertainment Conspiracy

People, you have been fooled! SM Entertainment has distracted you with multi-year contracts, lawsuits and tales of exploitation, but I know what the REAL conspiracy is.

Are you ready?

SM is CLONING idols!!! YES!  I am 84.7 % positive that SM has a team of scientists whose sole job is to clone idols. You haven’t noticed a slew of attractive Korean men who have cheeky cheeks and sing really well? Look!

Exhibit 1: Hye Sung of Shinhwa

Cheeky cheeks? Check! Pouty lips? Check! I suspect that Hye Sung is really the original, from which SM is taking genetic material for other idols. He is quiet and seems fairly sweet, and some have referred to him as a prince. These are things we will encounter with the clones. Oh, and let’s not forget about his singing ability!

Read more here at KPK: Kpop Kollective (originally published on July 1, 2011)

An Informal Review of Sun Jung’s Korean Masculinities: Part 2, Or, Why We’re Not Going to Talk about Bae Yong Joon

So, Nabi has given you a pretty good overview of the book and our general observations of it. Chapter 2 includes Sun Jung’s reading of the masculinity represented by Bae Yong Joon. We here at KPK have pretty strong opinions because most of the time, we are fairly confident in what we’re talking about.  This is the reason why I’m not going to talk about Sun Jung’s analysis of Bae Yong Joon. I haven’t seen Winter Sonata, so I can’t tell say anything about her reading of the way “middle-aged Japanese women” (her phrase) read Bae Yong Joon’s masculinity.

But that’s doesn’t mean I don’t have things to say about this chapter, because she talks about more than Bae Yong Joon…..

Read more here at KPK: Kpop Kollective.com (originally published on July 22, 2011)

An Informal Review of Sun Jung’s Korean Masculinities, Part 4, Or Who Are You Calling A Cult?

So now I’m going to tackle Sun Jung’s analysis of fan reaction to Chan-wook Park’s film, Oldboy.  Basically, Sun Jung argues that, well, I’ll let her explain it…..

Read more here at KPK: Kpop Kollective (originally published on August 25, 2011)